Sometimes, life goes tits up

Sometimes, life goes tits up

Hey Lovelies,

Welcome to my first blog post of 2017! I’m sorry that I’ve been M.I.A for so long, but I’m back now with regular posts and big plans for 2017, and what better way to kick off the New Year than with a blog post about everyones favourite topic: BOOBS! For those of you who don’t know, I decided last summer to have my boobs reduced and last September I packed my bag ready for an overnight stay in the hospital.

Now I’m not going to lie, this post has been sat in my drafts for months and I’ve written, deleted and re-written it about 1000 times. But I know that a lot of people have asked me about the procedure, people who are thinking of having this operation themselves and I wanted to make sure that this post was as factually correct as I could make it and not too scary. All of that being said, I am not a doctor (obviously) and so please do not let this blog post be the only thing that influences your decision! I have deliberately left out the medical deets because that is something that you can really only discuss with a medical professional; different people react to surgeries/ medication differently and I ain’t here to tell you how you would deal with this surgery, only how I’ve dealt with it!

Okay, now that all of the serious stuff is out of the way, let me tell you why I decided to have this operation. Big boobs run in my family (although no one in my family runs with their big boobs…) but I was cursed with the biggest of the lot and they were way too big for my small frame, leading to excruciating back and shoulder pain in addition to my spine starting to curve under the weight of them.

But the physical pain wasn’t the only factor that led to me going to the doctors, the mental suffering that came with this was just as bad, if not worse. They were the first things that people saw when they looked at me and not only did this draw unnecessary attention and comments from pervy men (and the occasional bitchy woman) but I looked like a pair of boobs with legs. I couldn’t get any clothes to fit me; tops/dresses to fit my boobs were too big for my body and tops/dresses that fitted my body were too small for my boobs. And let’s not even go there with the struggles I had shopping for bras. All of these factors combined caused my self confidence to drop significantly; I didn’t want to go to work as buying uniform was such a struggle. Nights out with friends meant struggle shopping for an outfit that I’d hate anyway. I was a wreck but I was so terrified of having surgery that I went months pretending that everything was fine and doing nothing about it.

But everyone has a breaking point and mine came just before I went on holiday last year. I sat alone in a Zara dressing room, crying because my back was aching, my shoulders were throbbing, the top I really loved for my hols barley covered my nips and the thought of putting on a bikini was stressing me tf out. Enough was enough.

So I went to the doctor and she told me what I already knew; my boobs were too big for my body and it wouldn’t matter how much weight I lost they were never going to be smaller without surgery. But the waiting list for this procedure was 2+ years so after a long talk about it with my parents, they took the decision out of my hands and said that they would pay for the operation; as I mentioned earlier, big boobs run in my family and my Mum also had a breast reduction 10 years ago, so she knew the struggle.

It’s funny, because once I had had my consultation and booked in for the surgery, all of my fears and doubts went away and turned into pure excitement. I wasn’t going to have aching shoulders. I could clothes shop again. I COULD BUY BRAS THAT DIDN’T HAVE THICK STRAPS!

I was ecstatic and the time between my first consultation and the operation went by so fast that I didn’t have time to overthink it or talk myself out of it. A week before the surgery I went in for my pre-op where they did some blood tests, checked my heart and generally just made sure that I was healthy and on the 15th September I put on my granny bra for the last time I checked into hospital.

As I said before, I don’t want to go into the nitty gritty of how the surgery goes (this is something that your surgeon will tell you about, including all of the risks and side effects) but I will tell you that a lot of people will see your boobs so you can’t be shying away and trying to cover up. They’ll have to be drawn on so that the surgeon knows where to cut, and the full team of medical pros will see you, top off, while you’re knocked out with a breathing tube shoved down your throat … I’m pretty sure I looked fit, although I’m glad there’s no photos to prove me wrong!

When I first came around after the surgery I was in a lot of pain, as the cuts on the underside of my boobs were stinging terribly, but I can honestly say that that was the worst of it and once the heavy duty painkillers kicked in the stitches just felt a bit tender. I also had an intermittent pain on my right side for the first few weeks after the op but I was reassured that this was normal; going through major surgery like that is essentially traumatic to the body and it needs time to adjust and recover.

One thing that they didn’t tell me before the surgery is that I wouldn’t be able to get my stitches wet for at least two weeks after, meaning no proper shower for two weeks after, and as a two shower a day kinda gal this was probably the most traumatic element of the experience.  It’s all well and good cleaning your bottom half with the bath/shower, using a soapy cloth to clean your pits and washing your hair over the sink but nothing quite compares to a proper shower. #Gross.

As for the rest of my recovery I was really conscious in the first couple of weeks, scared shitless that I would knock my stitches or move my arms a bit too quickly and pull them, and I didn’t get much sleep in the initial recovery period (sleeping on your back= not comfy) but I was ready to ease myself back into work after two weeks and after that I kind of stopped noticing. Now, my stitches are fully healed and although they’re still a bit red in places they don’t bother me at all! For those of you who were wondering, my stitches go in a U shape in line with the underneath bit of your boob, up the front to the nipple and around the nipple, and the worst stitches are definitely the underneath ones.

A few weeks back I went for my 4 month checkup and I’m sure you’ll all be glad to hear that everything is smashing, my surgeon thinks that my boobs look boss and I have to agree. I’ve entered a whole new world of pretty lace bras, tops that fit properly and these days people pay more attention to my face than my chest, can I get an AMEN?!

So now that you’ve reached the end of my longest blog post ever (soz) I’ll leave you with this: having this procedure is hands down the best thing I’ve ever done. My confidence has come on leaps and bounds, and most importantly it was something positive that I did for myself.

xo xo

Alex

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4 Comments

  1. WhatLydDid
    January 28, 2017 / 9:11 pm

    I’m so glad you’ve written this post, as i really think that it will help other big boobed ladies! Sometimes I don’t think breast reductions are taken seriously, as we’re all taught that big boobs are amazing, and of course they can be to some people, but it was obvious that yours were (literally) getting in the way!

    It was wonderful of your parents to step in and take away the pain and give you back your confidence. I can tell that this operation meant so much to you and you’re much happier as a result x

    • February 3, 2017 / 9:54 am

      This comment really means a lot! It’s definitely true, when I told a lot of people about the operation they were shocked because they thought my boobs were amazing … but they weren’t amazing for me!

      And I’m so blessed to have such amazing parents, I don’t think they’ll ever know how much it means to me!xx

  2. April 26, 2017 / 2:01 pm

    I’m so glad you’ve written this! Such a raw, honest post. I hope it helps someone in your position!
    As Lyd said, it was so lovely for your parents to step in and help, so I’m so glad you’re feeling so much better as a result! Xx

    • May 4, 2017 / 7:57 pm

      Ah thank you so much, this is such a lovely comment! I’m so lucky to have such understanding parents, and it has been something life changing for me having this operation!xx

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